History of Faculty

1921 Department of Sociology established at Masaryk University, Faculty of Arts – chaired by I. A. Bláha
1939 Czech universities closed down by the Protectorate regime to be reopened only in 1945
1947 University of Social Studies established in Brno, linked to Prague-based the Faculty of Social Studies at the University of Politics and Social Studies; The first rector becomes Inocenc Arnošt Bláha; the majority of lecturers come from three MU faculties – Faculty of Arts, Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Medicine
1949 Decision made to close down the University of Social Studies in Brno, gradully since the beginning of the academic year 1949/1950
1951 Graduation of last students; the college that is closely linked to Masaryk University closes down
1960 Masaryk University renamed to Jan Evangelista Purkyně University
1990 University renamed to Masaryk University in Brno
1995 School of Social Studies established as a part of MU Faculty of Arts (with professor Ivo Možný as director)
1997 Establishment of the Faculty of Social Studies by assuming the following study programs from the Faculty of Arts: Sociology, Social Work and Politics, Mass Communication and Journalism and Political Science; first dean is professor Ivo Možný
1998 Faculty operates in the buildings on Gorkého and Jaselská streets
2002 Opening of the Central Library of the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Social Studies (on the premises of the Faculty of Arts)
2004 Faculty obtains its own insignia (created by Lefteris Joanidis);
Launch of two Master programs in English
2005 Faculty moved into a reconstructed building on Joštova Street 10
University renamed to Masaryk University
2013 Opening of double degree in European Governance and joint degree in Cultural Sociology

Building History

The building was constructed in 1910 for a German technical school and it was designed by the architects Ferdinand Hrach, Josef Matzenauer, and Josef Nebehosteny. The grotesques at the facade represented architecture, structural engineering, electromechanics and chemistry. Allegorical personification in the Údolní Street depict Engineering – Architecture – Chemistry. The building provided large auditoriums, ceremonial halls as well as laboratories.

After the reconstruction completed in 2005 (following the long-term residence of MU Faculty of Medicine in the premises), the building  offered its students and employees excellent conditions for study and work. It houses modern lecture halls, a research library, several computer labs, specialized desktop publishing studios and multimedia rooms, radio and TV studios, as well as a student club with a cafe and a gallery for student activities. The glazed patio hall, amazing with its layout and architecture design, is a common location for social gatherings.

The Present

Today, the Faculty of Social Studies comprises seven departments, four research institutes, specialized units of IT support, and a comprehensive library. It educates more than 3,400 students in full-time and part-time forms of study and also participates in the life-long learning scheme. The faculty is located in a recently reconstructed building in the city’s historical centre, offering its students and employees excellent conditions for study and work. It houses modern lecture halls, a research library, several computer labs, specialized desktop publishing studios and multimedia rooms, as well as a student club with a cafe and a gallery for student activities. The glazed patio hall, amazing with its layout and architecture design, is a common location for social gatherings.

The faculty is undergoing dynamic development; instruction currently focuses on fields such as Sociology, Political Science, Psychology, Social Policy and Social Work, Media Studies and Journalism, Environmental Studies, International Relations, European Studies, Gender Studies, Psychotherapy Studies, Social Anthropology and Security and Strategic Studies. The aim is to link teaching activities with research carried out at individual departments and research performed at faculty institutes. Courses on offer are thus continually enriched and developed by the inclusion of the latest findings in basic and applied research in the social sciences.

In addition to the above mentioned development, the faculty has internationalized its teaching as well. It currently offers seven Master's degrees taught in English (three of them in international cooperation as joint or double degrees) and all doctoral programs can also be studied in English. Integral parts of the classes are other courses held in English, and some block sessions offered by visiting professors. The faculty has also opened courses in the lifelong learning for interested public.